African Appropriations: Cultural Difference, Mimesis, and by Matthias Krings

By Matthias Krings

Why could a Hollywood movie develop into a Nigerian video remake, a Tanzanian comedian ebook, or a Congolese tune video? Matthias Krings explores the myriad methods Africans reply to the relentless onslaught of worldwide tradition. He seeks out areas the place they've got tailored pervasive cultural varieties to their very own reasons as picture novels, comedian books, songs, posters, or even rip-off letters. those African appropriations exhibit the large scope of cultural mediation that's attribute of our hyperlinked age. Krings argues that there's now not an "original" or "faithful copy," yet simply unending changes that thrive within the fertile flooring of African renowned culture.

Show description

Read Online or Download African Appropriations: Cultural Difference, Mimesis, and Media PDF

Similar communication & media studies books

The Conspiracy of Art

The photographs from Abu Ghraib are as murderous for the United States as these of the international exchange middle in flames. the entire West is inside the burst of sadistic laughter of the yankee squaddies, because it is at the back of the development of the Israeli wall. this is often the place the reality of those photographs lies.

Consumption, Identity and Style: Marketing, meanings, and the packaging of pleasure

There's expanding speak, as we head for the decade of the millenium, of the post-industrial relaxation society. construction is geared increasingly more to the shopper wishes of a hugely cellular and prosperous society, that's principally unaware that its so much intimate moments and personal pleasures in patron tradition are buildings of a robust and manipulative patron marketplace.

Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology, Eleventh Edition

The 11th variation of Human Societies covers many new advancements of our speedily altering instances. between many worldwide updates are altering political ideologies, cyber war, biofuels and the issues they current, new inhabitants keep watch over projects, and the expanding democratization and financial strength of China.

The Conspirators' Hierarchy: The Committee of 300

Are you able to think an all robust crew, that is familiar with no nationwide limitations, above the legislation of all nations, one who controls each element of politics, faith, trade and undefined; banking, assurance, mining, the drug exchange, the petroleum undefined, a bunch answerable to nobody yet its individuals. To nearly all of us, this sort of staff would seem to be past the nation-states of probabilities and features of any given business enterprise, if that's what you think, you then are within the majority.

Additional info for African Appropriations: Cultural Difference, Mimesis, and Media

Example text

Coming to an understanding of the colonials’ power and learning to be strong like them was thus a matter of using one’s body the way the French did. (185–186) Copying the French with their own bodies and therefore internalizing, as Masquelier (2001) describes it, “what they took to be embodied forms of foreign selfhood and authority” meant not only “understanding and mastery over the alien universe of French colonial rules” (163) but actually acquiring certain qualities of the French—their force perhaps, as Fuglestad (1975) would have it, or whatever had turned the foreigners into such powerful human beings.

And these locally accessible and highly visible agents of colonial hegemony were the main targets of Babule actions. For example, the Babule were said to have arrested the guards de cercle or kept them out of their villages (Fuglestad 1975). Likewise, witches, whose activities were felt to have increased immensely since the advent of colonial rule, were experienced as agencies of dangerous and amoral power that needed to be contained for the common good. In my view, this suggests that despite its political effects, the so-called Babule movement is not to be regarded as a political revolt but rather a “doctrine of resistance and hope” (Worsley 1957: 26), which included utopian attempts at building a new society based on a radically different social order in the face of social crisis.

185–186) Copying the French with their own bodies and therefore internalizing, as Masquelier (2001) describes it, “what they took to be embodied forms of foreign selfhood and authority” meant not only “understanding and mastery over the alien universe of French colonial rules” (163) but actually acquiring certain qualities of the French—their force perhaps, as Fuglestad (1975) would have it, or whatever had turned the foreigners into such powerful human beings. What we observe here is a particular instance of copy and contact, in which the possessed imitated the powerful others to acquire some of their qualities.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.04 of 5 – based on 25 votes