A Companion to Classical Receptions (Blackwell Companions to by Lorna Hardwick, Christopher Stray

By Lorna Hardwick, Christopher Stray

Interpreting the great quantity of how during which the humanities, tradition, and regarded Greece and Rome were transmitted, interpreted, tailored and used, A spouse to Classical Receptions explores the effect of this phenomenon on either historic and later societies.Provides a finished creation and evaluation of classical reception - the translation of classical artwork, tradition, and suggestion in later centuries, and the quickest starting to be region in classicsBrings jointly 34 essays by means of a world workforce of individuals eager about old and glossy reception recommendations and practicesCombines shut readings of key receptions with wider contextualization and discussionExplores the effect of Greek and Roman tradition all over the world, together with the most important new parts in Arabic literature, South African drama, the historical past of images, and modern ethics

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A Companion to Classical Receptions (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World)

Interpreting the large quantity of how during which the humanities, tradition, and considered Greece and Rome were transmitted, interpreted, tailored and used, A significant other to Classical Receptions explores the influence of this phenomenon on either historic and later societies. offers a complete advent and review of classical reception - the translation of classical paintings, tradition, and proposal in later centuries, and the quickest transforming into sector in classicsBrings jointly 34 essays by means of a global staff of members interested in old and glossy reception thoughts and practicesCombines shut readings of key receptions with wider contextualization and discussionExplores the effect of Greek and Roman tradition all over the world, together with an important new parts in Arabic literature, South African drama, the background of images, and modern ethics

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The aim of the chapter is not to give a comprehensive overview of the reception of Homer in antiquity (that would be difficult even in a series of long monographs, or an encyclopaedia); rather, it aims to present some basic issues likely to confront students of ancient (and, indeed, modern) receptions of Homer. Defining the Subject How and by whom the Homeric poems were composed, when and for what reasons they were written down, how the Alexandrian editors arrived at their text of the Iliad and the Odyssey are questions that have exercised generations of scholars.

Depending on the answers given, the name ‘Homer’ acquires different meanings. qxd 13/09/2007 09:03 AM Page 28 28 Barbara Graziosi about the uses of his name. g. M. g. Powell 1991; cf. West 1998, though he would resist calling the man ‘Homer’: West 1999). These different conceptions dramatically affect the project of studying his ancient reception since, depending on our conceptual framework, we may focus on the texts of the Iliad and the Odyssey as they have reached us, or consider the broader epic tradition out of which those two poems gradually emerged.

First, there is the issue of defining what ‘Homer’ might mean: the name itself is first attested in the sixth century bce and, in the ancient sources, describes the author not just of the Iliad and the Odyssey but sometimes also of other poems: for example, the Homeric Hymns, the epics of the Theban and the Trojan cycle, The Capture of Oechalia. It seems that in the course of antiquity, definitions of what counted as the true work of Homer became gradually more stringent (Wilamowitz 1884: 353).

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